Interior Painting Techniques

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Using good painting techniques is key to achieving professional-looking results. Another tip is to use enough paint. Get into the habit of going to the paint can often. Let the paint do the work, and you’ll save time and get the finish you want.

Using a Brush

1. Hold a brush near the base of the handle.

2. Dip half the bristles into the paint and tap on the lip of the can. Don’t wipe it on the side.

3. Paint with enough pressure to bend the bristles slightly — don’t bear hard on the brush.

4. A 1″-2″ brush offers good control so it is well-suited for detail work such as cutting in around windows or painting molding. To apply paint to larger surfaces such as doors, use a 3″-4″ brush.

Using a Roller

1. Roll the roller slowly into the paint in the tray. Then, roll it back and forth until roller cover is evenly coated with paint.

2. Roll onto the tray’s ridges to remove excess paint.

3. For smooth surfaces: Cover about a two-foot-square using the N pattern shown. Cross roll to spread the paint. Finish, with light roller strokes in one direction, at a right angle to the cross roll.

4. If the surface you are painting is porous or textured, use a heavy-nap roller cover (1/2″ or more). Use a 1/4″ nap to maximize sheen on a smoother surface.

Painting Double-Hung Windows

1. For double-hung windows move each sash to the center of its track and paint the inside sash, starting with the crossbars. Then, paint the frame. Don’t paint the top edge of the inside sash; you’ll use it to move the sash. Next, paint the top half of the outside sash, starting with the crossbar, then the frame.

2. Close the sashes to within several inches of the closed position. Paint the rest of the outer sash and the top edge of the inner sash. Paint the window casing, then the sill.

3. Paint the check rails. Move both sashes down as far as they will go, then paint the upper rails. Once the paint is thoroughly dry, move both sashes up and paint the lower rails of the window.

Casement or Awning Windows

1. Open the windows and paint the top, side and bottom edges.

2. Finish with the crossbars, frame, casings and the sills.

Paneled Doors

1. First remove all hardware or cover it with masking tape. If paint does get on metal parts, wipe it up immediately with a soft cloth.

2. Start by painting the panels, working from top to bottom. For each panel, paint panel molding first, then the interior, using up and down strokes with your brush.

3. Next, paint the rest of the door, finishing with the outer edges. If the door swings out, paint the hinged edge. If the door swings in, paint the lock-side edge.

Flush Doors

1. Paint the edges first.

2. Then fill in the center area, working from top to bottom.

3. Finish with the frame and jamb.

Types of Stain to Use for Fiberglass Doors

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Fiberglass doors are great additions to the home because if they are maintained they can last for decades. They are durable and can be bought with a wood grain, thereby giving off the the elegance of wooden front doors but with the durability of fiberglass. As you change the look of your home the front door usually has to change with it. One of the problems associated with fiberglass doors is picking the right stain to use in order to refinish them. There are several stains that can be effectively used on fiberglass doors with great results and other stains should not be used on fiberglass doors. The following information will layout which stains is best used on fiberglass doors and which ones are not.

Gel Stains

Many people that stain fiberglass doors as part of their job often use gel stains with much trepidation. Even though manufacturers say it gel stains work on fiberglass, there are some problems with them. Stains work because they have something to latch on to and bond to the door. Fiberglass doors are made to not accept added moisture, which is why they make great doors. Gel stains are very fickle and require great care to apply to fiberglass doors. The main trick to applying a gel stain is to follow the instructions precisely thay are on the can. The directions for gel stain application can vary depending on the manufacturer so do not assume all gel stains are the same.

Oil-based Stains

This type of stain is probably the best for fiberglass doors. In addition to the stain, you will always want to seal it with a layer of polyethylene. However, when you do, make sure the polyethylene is also oil-based. Not every oil-based stain on the market will do the job of covering fiberglass doors. It has to be high quality so do not cut corners by using a cheap brand. The stain also has to be opaque in nature. Stains that are transparent or semi-transparent will not work on fiberglass doors. The last thing that you need to make sure of is that the oil-based stain is heavily pigmented. The stain needs to be able to grip to the fiberglass.

Exterior Stains

Since fiberglass doors are used for exterior use, you need a stain that is made for that purpose. It should meet with the other requirements of stains for fiberglass doors. This means that the stain should not be semi-transparent or transparent but opaque. You’ll also need to look at the UV rating on the stain as UV rays cause doors to fade in the sunlight.

Semi-transparent and Transparent Stains

Stains that are transparent or semi-transparent cannot be used on fiberglass doors that aren’t textured. The idea behind these stains is that they add a layer of color to a wood door so that the natural grain can still be seen. Fiberglass doors do not have a wood grain or a porous texture that can absorb the stain. However, some of these can be used with an undercoat.